Category Archives: Classic Cocktails

Classic cocktail recipes, vintage recipes and those classically styled recipes that have stood the test of time.

Dark Cherry Manhattan

Dark Cherry Manhattan Cocktail - Rittenhouse Rye, Lillet Blanc, Heering Cherry Liqueur, Angostura Bitters, Orange Twist Garnish

Dark Cherry Manhattan Cocktail – Rittenhouse Rye, Lillet Blanc, Heering Cherry Liqueur, Angostura Bitters, Orange Twist Garnish

A well made classic Manhattan is just one of my many favorite cocktails. I seldom grow tired of trying different recreations of this particular drink. Recently I started tinkering with one of my own Manhattan variations. Though the adjustments are minor, the changes made a big difference in taste. I created the (ri)1 & the Elusive Heering recipe in April 2009 when I first started experimenting with rye. The drink seemed to need a heavier hitting rye. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey 100 proof carries just enough weight and sweetness to balance the flavors of this drink.

This dark cherry variation of the Manhattan classic cocktail is deeply satisfying. Cinnamon wafts through with just a touch of chocolate. I sampled this one evening cocktail style and again over three square cubes of ice. There were both simply divine, but each tasted a little different. To be honest, though I am a huge fan of cocktails I preferred the rocks style version better. It was deeper in flavor, richer, more complex. Drinks on the rocks last a little longer for me anyway, so I savored it a little longer. Sample this both ways and let me know what you think.

Dark Cherry Manhattan Cocktail Recipe

Dark Cherry Manhattan – recipe by Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

2 ounces Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey

1/2 ounce Herring Cherry Liqueur

1/2 ounce Lillet Blanc

4 dashes Angostura Bitters

Orange Twist Garnish

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass or coupe. Garnish with fresh orange twist. Alternative: Pour mixture over one single large ice cube or two or three 1 – inch ice cubes for on the rocks serve.

All content ©2014 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

Negroni

Negroni Classic Cocktail Variation

Negroni Classic Cocktail Variation

The Negroni is one of my all-time favorite cocktails. The classic Negroni cocktail calls for equal parts gin, Campari and sweet vermouth. The layering of flavors in this particular drink has opened the door for so many variations. Gin has been changed for bourbon to make this a Boulevardier. Campari is swapped for various other potable bitters from Amaro to Cynar. Mmm…Cynar! Vermouth varies from thick, rich and delicious to sweet and spicy.

There are so many variations it is difficult to keep up with the diverse Negroni classic cocktail. My advice…get on board and start sampling. You are sure to find at least one variation that suits your fancy pants.

Negroni “No Cucumber Required” Recipe

Negroni Classic Cocktail Variation

Negroni

1-1/2 ounce Hendrick’s Gin

3/4 ounce Campari

3/4 ounce Punt e Mes Sweet Vermouth

Orange Twist

Combine liquids in a mixing glass with ice. Stir or shake according to preference. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

All content ©2014 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

White Lady Classic Cocktail

White Lady Classic Cocktail - Gin, Premium Orange Liqueur, Lemon juice

White Lady Classic Cocktail – Gin, Premium Orange Liqueur, Lemon juice

I have written about this classic cocktail before. The first time I tasted the White Lady classic cocktail was at Tales of the Cocktail 2009. That White Lady cocktail was much different, but quite delicious. Peter Dorelli adapted the classic recipe using Beefeater Gin, simple syrup and egg white. Egg whites and I were not besties at the time, but great bartenders like Peter Dorelli and lovely drinks like the White Lady have changed all that.

Make sure your martini glass or coupe is well chilled and your liquids are equally ice cold before straining into the glass.

Make sure your martini glass or coupe is well chilled and your liquids are equally ice cold before straining into the glass.

The White Lady is a Prohibition-era cocktail. This classic is ladylike in name only. It is a high powered, premium, high alcohol content drink. Sip wisely so your good intentions don’t go to the wayside. Three ingredients make this an easy drink to make. Make sure your martini glass or coupe is well chilled and your liquids are equally ice cold before straining into the glass. The White Lady classic cocktail is best served ice cold for maximum flavor. This is a nicely balanced drink with light sweetness and beautiful fresh citrus flavor. Serve well chilled for terrific crisp sharpness.

White Lady Classic Cocktail Recipe

White Lady Classic Cocktail

White Lady Classic Cocktail

White Lady – from Speakeasy: The Employees Only Guide to Cocktails Reimagined by Jason Kosmas and Dushan Zaric

1-3/4 ounce Plymouth Gin

1-1/4 ounce Cointreau

1 ounce Fresh Lemon Juice

Orange Peel

Combine liquids in a cocktail shaker filled with plenty of ice. Shake until well chilled. Double strain into a chilled martini glass or coupe. Double straining helps rid the shaken mixture of any stray ice chips. Twist a fresh orange peel over the drink to release the essential oils into the cocktail. Drop the twist into the drink. Enjoy!

I used Beefeater Gin and O3 Premium Orange Liqueur while mixing this drink. O3 Premium Orange Liqueur is a little sweeter than Cointreau in my opinion. Adjust the liqueur ratio according to your taste preference.

More White Lady Classic Cocktail Variations

Old Mr. Boston's recipe calls for egg white, powdered sugar, sweet cream and dry gin

Old Mr. Boston’s recipe calls for egg white, powdered sugar, sweet cream and dry gin

This isn’t the end all recipe for the White Lady. Some list the classic cocktail recipe as 2 ounces Gin, 1 ounce each Triple Sec and Lemon Juice with an Egg White. Another uses 1-3/4 ounce Gin with 1 ounce each Triple Sec and Lemon Juice with Egg White. Yet another lists the White Lady as 2 ounces Gin, 1/2 ounce each Cointreau and Lemon Juice with Egg White. My Old Mr. Boston 1967 copyright edition lists the recipe as follows:

White Lady Cocktail

White of 1 Egg

1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar

1 Teaspoon Sweet Cream

1-1/2 ounce Old Mr. Boston Dry Gin

Combine these ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake until well chilled. Strain into a 4 ounce cocktail glass.

So really the White Lady is a classic cocktail worth sipping, but there is no set in stone right or wrong way to make it. The right way is the way you will enjoy it. Just enjoy it in a ladylike or gentlemanly fashion. Cheers!

All content ©2014 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

Throwback Thursday: Fish Club Punch

The Fish Club Punch classic cocktail punch recipe was popular in the 1890's and is similar to ingredients in the Fish House Punch recipe. {photo credit Cheri Loughlin}

The Fish Club Punch classic cocktail punch recipe was popular in the 1890′s and is similar to ingredients in the Fish House Punch recipe. {photo credit Cheri Loughlin}

The Fish Club Punch recipe appears in the Here’s How Mixed Drinks book compiled and edited by W. C. Whitfield, published by Three Mountaineers, Inc, copyright 1941. The book is unique with its wood cover. But the sometimes meticulously drawn and other times doodle like illustrations make this book fascinating to thumb through. It is a real treat.

The Fish Club Punch recipe is very close to the popular Fish House Punch. However Fish House Punch leans more toward the rum base than cognac or brandy base. They carry many of the same ingredients in varying degrees.

The notation on this recipe compiled with Party Mixes says it was popular in the Gay Nineties. Gay Nineties is a wistful term referring to the 1890’s. This decade is also referred to as the Naughty Nineties by some. There is even a movie reference of the same Naughty Nineties name. This reference assures us the Fish Club Punch is a classic cocktail recipe for sure.

Here’s How Mixed Drinks book compiled and edited by W. C. Whitfield, published by Three Mountaineers, Inc, copyright 1941

Here’s How Mixed Drinks book compiled and edited by W. C. Whitfield, published by Three Mountaineers, Inc, copyright 1941

Fish Club Punch Recipe

This is the Fish Club Punch recipe as written in the Here’s How book. I amended the directions rather than copy those verbatim.

Fish Club Punch

1/3 pint Lemon Juice

3/4 pound Sugar (dissolved in water)

1/2 pint Cognac

1/4 pint Peach Brandy

1/4 pint Jamaica Rum

2-1/2 pints Cold Water

Pour all ingredients in a punch bowl. Stir to mix well. Add cracked ice.

Fish Club Punch Recipe Converted Measurements

Most of the recipes in this book call for powdered sugar. Scanning through I don’t recall seeing any that called for granulated sugar. However, this recipe did not specify powdered sugar as so many others did specifically mention powdered sugar or a sugar cube. The back of the book mentions the fact that sugar does not melt in alcohol, so it is advised to either melt the sugar in water first or use sugar syrup in the place of sugar. Make things easy. Place the sugar in the water while you gather the rest of your ingredients or use simple syrup and add it to taste.

Fish Club Punch – converted measurements

8 ounces Cognac

4 ounces Peach Brandy

4 ounces Jamaica Rum

5-1/3 ounces Lemon Juice

1-1/2 cup Granulated Sugar (dissolved in water)

40 ounces Cold Water

Large Ice Block or Ice Ring

Place sugar in half the amount of water. Stir to dissolve. Set aside. Add cognac, peach brandy, rum and lemon juice to a punch bowl. Stir. Add the water with dissolved sugar in it. Stir. Taste. Add remaining water a little at a time until punch is diluted to your preference. Remember, the ice block will melt adding dilution to the punch. Serve in punch cups (approximately 4 to 6 ounce servings) without ice since the punch bowl is already chilled.

Ideally, I would mix the ingredients and place the mixture in the refrigerator for 4 hours or overnight before pouring into a punch bowl with the block of ice. This insures the mixture is already at chilling point with less ice melt to start with.

Fish Club Punch Single Serve Recipe

The Fish Club Punch classic cocktail punch recipe was popular in the 1890's and is similar to ingredients in the Fish House Punch recipe. {photo credit Cheri Loughlin}

Fish Club Punch Classic Cocktails Punch Recipe

I love the delicious peach flavor that shines through with the dark richness of the cognac and rum. The playful citrusy sweet notes balance the drink perfectly. This is a great recipe to serve as a punch or sip as a single serve drink.

Fish Club Punch – single serve

3/4 ounce Cognac

1/2 ounce Peach Brandy

1/2 ounce Jamaica Rum

1/2 ounce Fresh Lemon Juice

1/4 ounce Simple Syrup

1-1/2 ounce Water

Orange or Lemon Twist

Place liquid ingredients in mixing glass without ice. Stir to allow all ingredients (especially the simple syrup) to combine. Pour into a rocks glass over a few cubes of ice or a single large cube of ice. Garnish with an orange or lemon twist.

The original recipe does not call for garnish. I thought the recipe benefited by the addition of a fresh orange twist, but it is not imperative to the cocktail. You decide. Use just enough ice to keep this drink cool, but not so much that it waters the drink down. This is a great drink to keep in mind for a single large ice cube to keep ice melt to a minimum.

I used E&J Gallo Brandy instead of cognac and Pusser’s Rum in place of Jamaica rum in this recipe. Use what you have on hand to replicate any recipe you would like to try.

All content ©2014 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

Colony Cocktail

This version of the Colony Cocktail is cited in The Essential Cocktail by Dale DeGroff. Dale mentions that he found this version of the recipe in the 1953 book, Bottoms Up by Ted Saucier.

This version of the Colony Cocktail is cited in The Essential Cocktail by Dale DeGroff. Dale mentions that he found this version of the recipe in the 1953 book, Bottoms Up by Ted Saucier.

If you are a cocktail enthusiast or just love trying oldie but goodie classic cocktails, then there are two Colony Cocktail recipes worth checking out.

The Colony Cocktail is said to have been the house cocktail at the Colony restaurant in Manhattan. Read about the 1971 closing of Colony in Vanity Fair and the A-list society members who gathered there through the years and for one last toast. There is also quite a bit of Colony history in the story.

The Colony was open through the Prohibition years. They kept their liquor stash in an elevator as a precautionary measure against raid. The elevator would carry the liquor to the second floor where a dry-out hospital facility was located.

You’ll find a little tidbit of cocktail history too. Marco, the bartender, is credited for inventing the shaken rather than stirred martini. It seems there is a James Bond connection to the restaurant. Go read about it in the link above.

Vodka Based Colony Cocktail Recipe

This version of the recipe is cited in The Essential Cocktail by Dale DeGroff. Dale mentions that he found this version of the recipe in the 1953 book, Bottoms Up by Ted Saucier.

This Colony Cocktail is hardly sweet, slightly bitter with balanced tartness. This creates a tantalizing edginess to the cocktail. It is curiously easy to take a sip and put it down, but difficult to resist picking back up for another go round. There is quite a bit of zing to this one. If you prefer more tartness to your cocktails rather than sweet, this oldie but goodie is a go for you!

This version of the Colony Cocktail is cited in The Essential Cocktail by Dale DeGroff. Dale mentions that he found this version of the recipe in the 1953 book, Bottoms Up by Ted Saucier.

Colony Cocktail

Colony Cocktail

1-1/2 ounce Vodka

1 ounce Southern Comfort

1/2 ounce Fresh Squeezed Lime Juice

Lemon Peel for Garnish

Add all liquid ingredients to a cocktail shaker filled two-thirds full of ice. Shake until well chilled. Strain into a small chilled martini glass. Garnish with a thinly sliced lemon peel twisted over the top of the cocktail.

Gin Based Colony Cocktail Recipe

The more commonly known version of the Colony Cocktail calls for gin, grapefruit juice and maraschino liqueur. It is entirely different from the one above. This version is also referenced by some as the Colony restaurant cocktail. Either way, they are both worth sampling.

Colony Cocktail

1-1/2 ounce Gin

3/4 ounce Grapefruit Juice (some recipes specify pink grapefruit juice)

2 teaspoons to 1/2 ounce Maraschino Liqueur – according to preference

Grapefruit Twist Garnish – optional

Place liquids in a mixing glass with ice. Stir until well chilled. Strain into a small chilled martini glass. Garnish with a thinly sliced grapefruit peel twisted over the top of the cocktail if desired.

All content ©2014 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com