Tag Archives: Cherry Liqueur

King Alphonse and Angel’s Tip

Angel's Tip After Dinner Cocktail - cocktail cousin to King Alphonse {www.intoxicologist.net}

Angel’s Tip After Dinner Cocktail – cocktail cousin to King Alphonse

King Alphonse and Angel’s Tip are interesting cocktails. These drinks are classified as after dinner drinks. Each drink also has several minor recipe variations. Don’t just save these drinks for after dinner, though. They make great conversation starters and delicious dessert drinks. These layered drinks are also fun to make. So round up the ingredients and try your hand at cocktail layering techniques with someone special. It will definitely make date night fun!

Happy layering and sipping!

King Alphonse Drink Recipe Variations

King Alphonse - King Alfonse After Dinner Cocktail {www.intoxicologist.net}

King Alphonse – King Alfonse After Dinner Cocktail

King Alphonse

1 ounce Dark Crème de Cacao

1 ounce Lightly Whipped Unsweetened Heavy Cream

Place dark crème de cacao in bottom of pousse café glass or cordial glass. Lightly whip cream with whisk. Carefully layer cream over the top of cream de cacao by slowly pouring it over the back of a bar spoon. This version of the King Alphonse becomes an Angel’s Tip once cherry garnish is placed on top.

Other variations change the spelling to King Alfonse, vary the measurements and swap out crème de cacao for coffee liqueur.

King Alfonse

1-1/2 ounce Dark Crème de Cacao

1 ounce Heavy Cream

Place dark crème de cacao in bottom of pousse café glass or cordial glass. Carefully layer heavy cream over the top by slowly pouring it over the back of a bar spoon.

King Alphonse 2

2-1/2 ounces Coffee Liqueur

1/2 ounce Heavy Cream

Place dark coffee liqueur in bottom of pousse café glass or cordial glass. Carefully layer heavy cream over the top by slowly pouring it over the back of a bar spoon.

Angel’s Tip Drink Recipe Variations

I have seen Angel’s Tip referred to by many as an Angel’s Tit. The Old Mr. Boston cocktail recipe book lists this recipe as an Angel’s Tip. This recipe is the close cousin drink to the first recipe listed in this post.

Angel's Tip After Dinner Cocktail - cocktail cousin to King Alphonse {www.intoxicologist.net}

Angel’s Tip After Dinner Cocktail

Angel’s Tip

1 ounce Dark Crème de Cacao

1 ounce Heavy Cream

Cherry Garnish

Place dark crème de cacao in bottom of pousse cafe or cordial glass. Carefully layer heavy cream over the top by slowly pouring over the back of a bar spoon. Garnish with skewered cherry placed over the top of the drink.

Reduce the amounts to 1/2 ounce each in this after dinner drink and you will keep this dessert style drink to 98 calories. Have your dessert and sip it too!

This is where the Angel’s Tip recipes and names get a little more fun and interesting! This is the Angel’s Tit cocktail that is often confused with the recipe above.

Angel’s Tit

1/4 ounce White Crème de Cacao – chilled

1/4 ounce Cherry Liqueur – chilled

1/4 ounce Half & Half – chilled

Maraschino Cherry Garnish

Place chilled cream de cacao in shot or cordial glass. Carefully layer cherry liqueur on top of cream de cacao by slowly pouring it over the back of a bar spoon. Finish by layering half and half over the top in the same manner. Top with skewered cherry placed over the top.

Old Mr. Boston also has another lovely angel cocktail called the Angel’s Kiss. The book does not specify dark or white crème de cacao. I have seen both in researching this recipe. Since this is the bottom layer with darker layer just above it, white crème de cacao might be nice for visual appeal.

Angel’s Kiss

1/4 ounce Cream de Cacao – chilled

1/4 ounce Crème Yvette – chilled

1/4 ounce Brandy – chilled

1/4 ounce Sweet Cream – chilled

Place crème de cacao in bottom of pousse café or cordial glass. Carefully layer Crème Yvette on top by slowly pouring it over the back of a bar spoon on top of first layer. Layer brandy on top of Crème Yvette in same manner. Finish by layering sweet cream on top of brandy.

All content ©2014 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

A History of Drinking Guest Post: Louis XIV

A History of Drinking - Louis XIV & The Sun King Cocktails

A History of Drinking Greg Priebe – Louis XIV & The Sun King Cocktails

Guest Post by Greg Priebe of A History of Drinking – On May 14, 1643, Louis XIV, the only surviving son of Louis XIII and Anne of Austria, became the king of France at age 4 upon the death of his father. He was a mere 4-1/2 years old at the time. Legend has it that when the dying Louis XIII asked his son if he knew who he was, the young boy replied confidently, “Louis the Fourteenth, father”.

Louis (aka “The Sun King”) was the epitome of the absolute monarch and a great patron of the arts. Under his gaze, France would become the cultural center of the world but his rule would also be marked by a series of complicated wars on the European continent.

Louis would rule until to his death by gangrene at age of 76 in September 1715, a total of 72 years and 110 days, the longest ever in European history. He outlived all of his sons (the 3rd eldest now King of Spain and as so, was disqualified from the succession) and grandsons, so the crown eventually passed to his great-grandson, Louis, Duke of Anjou.

Our first Cocktail tie-in was adapted from a discussion on the Oh Gosh! cocktail blog, but we decided to give it more of a French/Creole twist. London Dry Gin has been replaced by the French G’Vine Gin and the original Angostura bitters are swapped out in favor of Peychauds. Conveniently enough, Chambord was inspired (if you believe the press materials) by “a luxurious raspberry liqueur produced for King Louis XIV” during his visit to eponymous Chateau in the 17th century.

Louis XIV photo by Greg Priebe of A History of Drinking

Louis XIV photo by Greg Priebe of A History of Drinking

Louis XIV

2 ounce Chambord

1 ounce G’Vine “Nouaison” Small Batch Gin

2 dashes Peychauds bitters

A squeeze of Orange Juice

Glass: Cocktail

Garnish: Orange Slice

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange slice.

Next, we have “The Sun King” cocktail and once again, we’ve replaced the original recipe’s standard London Dry gin with G’vine’s “Nouaison”. The aim was to lighten the juniper notes a bit, but not go so far as to add something as delicate as G’vine’s “Floraison” offering. The type of bitters used in this drink varies a bit depending on the source, but we decided to go with the fantastic Mexican Mole bitters produced by Bitter End.

Sun King photo by Greg Priebe of A History of Drinking

Sun King photo by Greg Priebe of A History of Drinking

The Sun King

Original recipe by Combier, adapted from Barnonedrinks.com

1 ounce Cherry Liqueur (the original called for Combier Rouge Cherry Liqueur, we used Heering Cherry)

1-1/2 ounce G’Vine “Nouaison” Small Batch Gin

3 dashes Bitter End’s Mexican Mole Bitters

1 Sugar Cube

Lemon Peel

Glass: Cocktail

Garnish: Orange peel Instructions

In a mixing glass, muddle the sugar cube with the bitters and lemon peel. Add the Cherry Liqueur and Gin with cracked ice and stir for approx. 20 seconds or until the glass feels uncomfortably cold. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange peel.

Greg Priebe is a part time event bartender, amateur historian and full time educator. A longtime cocktail, beer and spirit enthusiast, he started the A History of Drinking blog in 2009. A History of Drinking can be found on twitter under the handle @drinkinghistory and on Facebook at facebook.com/ahistoryofdrinking

All Content ©2013 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter & facebook.com/Intoxicologist – or email str8upcocktails@gmail.com

10 Two Ingredient Cocktails to Mix at Home

I’m often surprised to find so many people who will mix rum & coke, orange juice and vodka or bourbon and soda, but say they would never just make a cocktail at home. Some feel cocktails are more for a night on the town. Others are a bit intimidated by the thought of pulling out a cocktail shaker (if they have one), icing a glass and mixing the cocktail. In reality, mixing a cocktail is merely a step or two away from cocktails served straight up.

A few steps to remember when making a cocktail; instead of placing ice in your highball or rocks glass, place ice in a cocktail glass with a bit of water to chill the glass or keep a few cocktail glasses in the freezer until time to use them. The other item needed is cocktail shaker with strainer or almost every kitchen has a container with lid and small strainer. Those will both work for the impromptu home bartender.

More Two Ingredient Cocktails to sip your way through can be found in the highlighted link.

The Orange Blossom is an excellent alternative to the popular, but ordinary Screwdriver or vodka and orange juice. Gin brings more flavor to the drink with its botanical mix. Orange juice lessens a bit of the brashness some might expect from gin, making this a great starter cocktail for those just beginning to dabble with gin cocktails.

Satan's Whiskers builds on the Orange Blossom cocktail by adding dry & sweet vermouth, Grand Marnier and Bitters - photo by Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Satan’s Whiskers builds on the Orange Blossom cocktail by adding dry & sweet vermouth, Grand Marnier and Bitters – photo by Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Orange Blossom

1-1/4 ounce Gin

1-1/4 ounce Orange Juice

Combine liquids in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

Perhaps the Cornell Cocktail would be an intermediate gin cocktail to sample since it moves away from fresh fruit ingredients and uses liqueur to complement the gin. Some cherry liqueurs can come across a bit perfumed, others taste a bit more chocolate covered cherry-ish. Sample a few and find your favorite.

Chilled Martini Glass photo copyright Cheri Loughlin

Cornell Cocktail

2 ounces Gin

1/2 ounce Cherry Liqueur

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

Pink Gin captures the attention of the true gin enthusiast. Gin is forefront and center with lots of spice added to the glass with the classic bitters inclusion.

Pink Gin

2-1/2 ounces Gin

6 dashes Angostura Bitters

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

For those already immersed in the world of gin and lovers of peated smokey scotch there is the Smokey Martini. Instead of filling the cocktail glass with ice and adding water to chill, fill your cocktail glass with ice and add the scotch. Allow to sit for a few moments. Then swirl to coat the inside of the glass.

Two Martinis Outdoors 4 photo copyright Cheri Loughlin

Smokey Martini

2-1/2 ounces Gin

1/2 ounce Laiphroaig Whisky

Place ice and whisky in chilled cocktail glass. Swirl & toss. Place gin in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into prepared cocktail glass.

If the deep peated flavor of Laiphroaig is just too much for your palate, try the Dusty Martini with a lighter scotch expression. Just remember the olive is garnish. This isn’t Dirty Martini style with splash of olive juice added.

Dusty Martini

2-1/4 ounce Gin

1/4 ounce Scotch

Olive Garnish

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with pierced olive.

For those with a bit of a sweet tooth, the Stinger is a classic cocktail with a bit of wintry feel with its minty liqueur inclusion. Feel free to use clear or green crème de menthe. The difference is merely color.

Stinger

2-1/2 ounce Brandy

1/4 ounce White Crème de Menthe

Combine liquids in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into an Old Fashioned glass over fresh crushed ice or strain into chilled cocktail glass according to preference.

If sweeter (sweet vermouth sort of sweet) is more your thing, this cocktail just might send your taste buds soaring. Even though this is a chilled cocktail, it’s nice and warming as it is savored.

Dubonnet cocktail - generic -photo property of Cheri Loughlin

Bob Danby

3 ounces Dubonnet Rouge

1-1/2 ounce Brandy

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

This cocktail is appropriately named in my opinion. Fresh squeezed orange juice balances the lightly spiced cocktail with refreshing zest. This is also one of those cocktails that would be equally refreshing served on the rocks. Just don’t let the ice melt too much or it becomes a bit of a watery mess by the time you reach the bottom of the glass.  

Appetizer

3 ounces Dubonnet Rouge

1 Orange – freshly squeezed

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

Flavored brandies are a terrific way to step your cocktail experience up a notch. One of my favorites is apricot flavored brandy. It is wonderful as flavorful inclusion in a classic Daiquiri.

A.J.

1-1/2 ounce Apple Brandy

1 ounce Grapefruit Juice

Combine liquids in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

This last cocktail is an interesting mix of brandy and dry vermouth. I suggest allowing just a bit of maraschino cherry juice to stay on the cherry when it’s time to garnish. This will bring a hint of sweetness to the cocktail.

Carroll Gardens Cocktail

2 ounces Brandy

1/2 ounce Dry Vermouth

Maraschino Cherry Garnish

Combine liquids in mixing glass with ice. Stir to chill. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

I think the most important thing to remember when mixing cocktails at home is keep it simple to start and experiment a lot! A recipe is not etched in stone. Tweak it to how you like it. Then it’s perfect for you!

 

Cheri Loughlin Photography - Cocktail Development & Photography Services

 

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Barefoot Midnight Memento

After dinner cocktails during the fall and winter months are an excellent way to relax and reminisce with friends and family. Barefoot Midnight Memento easily combines into late night sipping cocktail with fruit cake nutty sweetness.

Barefoot Midnight Memento Recipe

Barefoot Midnight Memento - Cheri Loughlin Cocktail Development Services

Barefoot Midnight Memento – recipe by Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

2 ounces Barefoot Cabernet Sauvignon Wine

1/2 ounce Crème de Cacao

1/2 ounce Cherry Liqueur

Combine liquids in snifter glass. Optional garnish: Single brandied cherry skewered and placed across top of snifter glass.

The Barefoot Midnight Memento cocktail recipe was commissioned by Barefoot Wine & Bubbly as part of the Corporate Mixology program offered by Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. Find more recipes created by Cheri Loughlin for Barefoot Wine & Bubbly on this site and at BarefootWine.com and by following Barefoot Wine on Facebook.

All content ©2012 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

Call it Kismet

Call it Kismet utilizes Heering Cherry liqueur’s deep cherry flavor with subtle chocolate notes then laces in rich coffee and lush vanilla. {Recipe & Photo credit: Mixologist Cheri Loughlin}

Call it Kismet utilizes Heering Cherry liqueur’s deep cherry flavor with subtle chocolate notes then laces in rich coffee and lush vanilla. {Recipe & Photo credit: Mixologist Cheri Loughlin}

Perspective, karma and fortuity intertwine within this champagne flute to ultimately dance upon the tip of the tongue.  That’s why it’s Call it Kismet.  Believe in Lady Luck, destiny, hard work or ordinary happenstance.  No matter how you call the future, once in a while everything comes down to the luck of the draw.  Call it Kismet utilizes Heering Cherry liqueur’s deep cherry flavor with subtle chocolate notes then laces in rich coffee and lush vanilla.  While it could have stopped at very simple, Brut Champagne adds the divine intervention of bubbly.

Call it Kismet Cocktail Recipe

Call it Kismet – recipe by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

3/4 ounce Heering Cherry Liqueur

1/2 ounce Kahlua Especial Coffee Liqueur

1/2 ounce Vanilla Liqueur

3 ounces Brut Champagne

Cherry Garnish

Combine liqueurs in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to chill. Strain into chilled champagne flute. Top with champagne. Garnish with cherry. Wonderful deeply rich flavor of cherries kissed by hint of chocolate, rounded out by the essence of vanilla.

All content ©2012 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com