Tag Archives: Scotch

10 Excellent Scotch Cocktails

There are terrific classic scotch cocktails and new contemporary scotch cocktails that are excellent. Keep sipping scotch neat or on the rocks, but sample a few scotch cocktails now and again for something new at Happy Hour. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

There are terrific classic scotch cocktails and new contemporary scotch cocktails that are excellent. Keep sipping scotch neat or on the rocks, but sample a few scotch cocktails now and again for something new at Happy Hour. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Some cringe at the thought of sipping scotch any other way than neat or on the rocks. But there are terrific classic scotch cocktails and new contemporary scotch cocktails that are equally enjoyable if given the chance.

Ten to twelve years ago I had never tasted a drop of scotch. I always assumed scotch was a man’s drink. Scotch should be sipped from small glasses and seldom with any ice. Those days are long gone. I love scotch. I love scotch neat, on the rocks and I adore great scotch cocktails. When scotch cocktails are balanced just right, they are simply fabulous!

The following are some of the best scotch cocktails I have sampled to date. Find a few recipes that pique your interest and start sampling. In the meantime I will continue my search for more scotch recipes to share. Links to all the scotch drink recipes are highlighted in text. You can also simply click on any photo to go directly to the post with the referenced scotch recipe. Most recipes also include tasting notes and similar recipes you might enjoy as well. The Scotch tag includes scotch cocktails and scotch reviews.

{National Scotch Day is July 27}

Classic Scotch Cocktails

The Bobby Burns cocktail is named for the Scottish Poet, Robert Burns. This recipe is an adaptation by Omaha bartender, Chris Engles. His version uses a fabulous aromatic allspice and lemon twist garnish. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

The Bobby Burns cocktail is named for the Scottish Poet, Robert Burns. This recipe is an adaptation by Omaha bartender, Chris Engles. His version uses a fabulous aromatic allspice and lemon twist garnish. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

The Bobby Burns cocktail is named for the Scottish Poet, Robert Burns. The Bobby Burns included on The Intoxicologist site varies a bit from the original recipe. Original recipes place equal parts scotch and red vermouth with mere dashes of Benedictine. The recipe included here is an adaptation by Omaha bartender, Chris Engles. His version uses a fabulous aromatic allspice and lemon twist garnish. It is truly spectacular!

Blood and Sand Scotch Cocktails - This classic dates into the 1930’s, but little else is known about the drink’s creation. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Blood and Sand Scotch Cocktails – This classic dates into the 1930’s, but little else is known about the drink’s creation. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Some Blood and Sand scotch cocktails call for all equal measurements. The Blood and Sand cocktail recipe shown here varies the measurements slightly. This classic dates into the 1930’s, but little else is known about the drink’s creation.

Mark Twain Classic Scotch Cocktails. Recipe dates back to at least 1874. Classic Cocktail using scotch or single malt scotch whisky. Recipe consists of scotch, lemon or fresh lemon sour, sugar or simple syrup, classic bitters or Angostura bitters. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Mark Twain Classic Scotch Cocktails. Recipe dates back to at least 1874. Classic Cocktail using scotch or single malt scotch whisky. Recipe consists of scotch, lemon or fresh lemon sour, sugar or simple syrup, classic bitters or Angostura bitters. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Luckily a reader brought the Mark Twain cocktail to my attention earlier this year. This scotch cocktail dates back to at least 1874. The link lists the original version and a tweaked variation that I preferred a little better. Try both scotch cocktails and decide which Mark Twain cocktail you like the best!

Cameron's Kick Scotch Cocktails - Classic Cocktail 1930's era, possibly before. Made with Single Malt Scotch Whisky or Blended Scotch according to preference, Irish Whiskey, Lemon Juice, Orgeat Syrup. Orange Bitters is sometimes called for in exchange for Orgeat Syrup. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Cameron’s Kick Scotch Cocktails – Classic Cocktail 1930’s era, possibly before. Made with Single Malt Scotch Whisky or Blended Scotch according to preference, Irish Whiskey, Lemon Juice, Orgeat Syrup. Orange Bitters is sometimes called for in exchange for Orgeat Syrup. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

This scotch cocktail is also an Irish whiskey cocktail. Cameron’s Kick is a fabulous cocktail for those of you who really want to taste the whisky. I suggest full bodied single malt scotch for deeper, richer flavor. The post contains several links to other sites with recipe variations.

Rob Roy Scotch Cocktails - The Rob Roy is basically a Manhattan using scotch rather than bourbon or rye. Make it dry or make it sweet, on the rocks or as a cocktail. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Rob Roy Scotch Cocktails – The Rob Roy is basically a Manhattan using scotch rather than bourbon or rye. Make it dry or make it sweet, on the rocks or as a cocktail. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Ratios for the Rob Roy vary depending on bartender, website and cocktail book. To be perfectly honest, ratios for this scotch cocktail are all a matter of personal preference. The Rob Roy is basically a Manhattan using scotch rather than bourbon or rye. Make it dry or make it sweet, on the rocks or as a cocktail.

The Rusty Nail and Godfather Scotch Cocktails are two ingredient drinks. One uses Drambuie, the other uses Amaretto. Measurements vary depending upon bartender, website or cocktail book. Godfather drink pictured. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

The Rusty Nail and Godfather Scotch Cocktails are two ingredient drinks. One uses Drambuie, the other uses Amaretto. Measurements vary depending upon bartender, website or cocktail book. Godfather drink pictured. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Some recipes call for equal parts scotch and Drambuie in the Rusty Nail. Others call for 2 parts scotch to 1 part Drambuie. My personal preference is more scotch to less sweet. I like to taste the scotch with hint of honeyed spice flavor in my Rusty Nail. One thing is certain, the Rusty Nail is extremely easy to make since it is only two ingredients over ice. Godfather is another easy two ingredient drink using scotch.

Arnaud's Special Cocktail Scotch Cocktails - Arnaud’s Special Cocktail is a New Orleans cocktail dating back to the 1940’s. It could be considered a cousin to the Rob Roy. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Arnaud’s Special Cocktail Scotch Cocktails – Arnaud’s Special Cocktail is a New Orleans cocktail dating back to the 1940’s. It could be considered a cousin to the Rob Roy. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Arnaud’s Special Cocktail is a New Orleans cocktail dating back to the 1940’s. It could be considered a cousin to the Rob Roy. Arnaud’s Special Cocktail uses Dubonnet Rouge and Orange bitters in place of Red Vermouth and classic bitters.

Contemporary Scotch Cocktails and Drinks

Sam Ross created the Penicillin drink in 2005. He uses a house made Honey-Ginger Syrup. I used a Ginger-Vanilla Syrup. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Sam Ross created the Penicillin drink in 2005. He uses a house made Honey-Ginger Syrup. I used a Ginger-Vanilla Syrup. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Sam Ross created the Penicillin drink in 2005. He uses a house made Honey-Ginger Syrup that is nearly impossible to duplicate since the recipe for the syrup is not given. I created the Ginger-Vanilla Syrup for use in the Penicillin cocktail. Full syrup recipe is listed. Even though this recipe is not exactly as Sam Ross originally created it, the Penicillin as shown is still a scotch drink worth sampling as is.

The Curtis Hotel contains Irish whiskey and scotch. It is a beautiful, warming sip that glides easily over the tongue. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

The Curtis Hotel contains Irish whiskey and scotch. It is a beautiful, warming sip that glides easily over the tongue. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Another mixed whisky drink that is extremely popular around St. Patrick’s Day is The Curtis Hotel. The Curtis Hotel contains Irish whiskey and scotch. It is a beautiful, warming sip that glides easily over the tongue.

Gary Regan created a fun little winner of a cocktail, naming it The Reluctant Tabby. This scotch cocktail uses a minimal amount of scotch with Dubbonet Rouge and Limoncello. - photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Gary Regan created a fun little winner of a cocktail, naming it The Reluctant Tabby. This scotch cocktail uses a minimal amount of scotch with Dubbonet Rouge and Limoncello. – photo by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Gary Regan created a fun little winner of a cocktail, naming it The Reluctant Tabby. This scotch cocktail uses a minimal amount of scotch with Dubbonet Rouge and Limoncello. The ingredients sounded a little odd to me at first, but the drink is just super. Give it a whirl. Gary also created Babbling Brook, another scotch cocktail with B&B Liqueur and Absinthe.

Three Wisemen Shot Recipe Card for personal use only. Right click to save to personal computer file. Print for personal use only - recipe card by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

Three Wisemen Shot Recipe Card for personal use only. Right click to save to personal computer file. Print for personal use only – recipe card by Mixologist Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

There are a few more scotch cocktails you might like to try. The Smoky Martini for those who love a great Martini variation. There is also a Smoky Martini that includes orange liqueur. The Three Wisemen Shot is a classic celebration shot. You know who you are!

Cheri Loughlin Beverage Consultant & Photography Services

All content ©2013 Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist. All Rights Reserved. Chat with Cheri @Intoxicologist on Twitter and facebook.com/Intoxicologist or str8upcocktails@gmail.com

The Penicillin Cocktail is Good for What Ails You

Penicillin Cocktail 003

Sam Ross created The Penicillin Cocktail in 2005. This was a time when it was almost unheard of to place even a single cube of ice in a glass of scotch. It kind of still is. But Sam went the distance and shook an entire serving of scotch with ice and created an amazing drink. Watch Sam make and explain the detail behind his signature Penicillin cocktail.

The Penicillin cocktail is good for ails you. It’s warming, lightly sweet with wonderful smoky spice. Ginger sweetness lilts through the drink bit by bit the longer this scotch cocktail sits in the glass. And will you just take a look at that amazing piece of ice. One Gläce Luxury Ice G-Cubed went the distance of two Penicillin cocktails with minimal melt factor.

Penicillin Cocktail 011

The Penicillin Cocktail with Gläce Luxury Ice G-3

Penicillin

2 ounces Single Malt Scotch

3/4 ounce Fresh Lemon Juice

3/4 ounce Ginger Vanilla Syrup*

1/4 ounce Islay Single Malt Scotch

Candied or Fresh Ginger Disk Garnish – optional

Place single malt Scotch, lemon juice and ginger syrup in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into rocks glass over fresh ice. Float Islay Scotch on top. Garnish with candied or fresh ginger disk.

You might have noticed the recipe I’ve listed above varies just a bit from the one Sam describes in the video. As he mentioned, it is nearly impossible to duplicate his honey-ginger syrup. I also prefer Single Malt Scotch as mentioned when writing about the Cameron’s Kick scotch cocktail.

The Ginger Vanilla Syrup I created is listed below and posted in Mixers & Garnishes with step by step photos. This syrup is spicy sweet, caramel in color and delicious. It would be a terrific addition to dark rum Daiquiri’s.

Demerara Ginger Vanilla Syrup 286

Ginger Vanilla Syrup – created by Cheri Loughlin

3 Tablespoons Garden Gourmet Ginger Paste

1 cup Demerara Cane Sugar

2/3 cup Water

1 ounce Homemade Vanilla Extract

Place ginger, sugar and water in saucepan over low heat. Stir continuously until sugar has melted and mixture begins to lightly bubble. Remove from heat. Double strain into heat resistant measuring cup. Allow to cool for 10 to 15 minutes. Add vanilla. [store purchased Vanilla Extract may be substituted] Stir. Once syrup is completely cool, place in glass container with lid. Keep refrigerated until ready to use.

Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon – str8upcocktails @ gmail.com – ©2013 Cheri Loughlin-The Intoxicologist, All Rights Reserved.

Mark Twain Classic Cocktail

The Mark Twain scotch cocktail apparently dates back well into the 1800’s making it a classic cocktail for sure. It is described by Mark Twain in a letter to his wife dated January, 1874. Twain had been traveling in London. While staying there he enjoyed a “cock-tail” before breakfast, dinner and just before bed containing Scotch, fresh lemon, crushed sugar and Angostura bitters.

Mark Twain Classic Cocktail - Classic Cocktail using scotch or single malt scotch whisky. Recipe consists of scotch, lemon or fresh lemon sour, sugar or simple syrup, classic bitters or Angostura bitters.

This cocktail was recommended by Steve S. from comments on the Intoxicologist Facebook page. Thank you Steve!

Mark Twain

2 ounces Scotch

1-1/2 ounce Fresh Lemon Sour*

2 dashes Angostura Bitters

Combine liquids in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into chilled martini glass. *Fresh Lemon Sour: 2 parts Fresh Lemon Juice, 1 part Simple Syrup

I sampled the Mark Twain as suggested by Steve. I wasn’t thoroughly in love with it, but found great potential in it. The lemon overwhelmed the scotch entirely too much for my taste. It sort of flat lined into all acid lemon in my opinion. So I “tweaked” Mark Twain, so to speak. Don’t tell his wife!

Mark Twain Classic Cocktail - Classic Cocktail using scotch or single malt scotch whisky. Recipe consists of scotch, lemon or fresh lemon sour, sugar or simple syrup, classic bitters or Angostura bitters.

“Tweaked” Mark Twain – adapted by Cheri Loughlin, The Intoxicologist

2 ounces Single Malt Scotch

1/2 ounce Fresh Lemon Juice

Slightly less than 1/2 ounce Simple Syrup

3 dashes Angostura Bitters

Combine liquids in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into chilled martini glass.

I think a flamed orange peel might go terrific with this cocktail, but I got a little carried away sipping it and comparing it to the first version to stop and flame a peel. I suppose that means more research is in order! This variation of the Mark Twain classic cocktail renders a bit of nut flavor, mocha notes and subtle orange. In a word; delicious!

Cocktailia.com uses less Scotch, and a combination of 3/4 ounce Lemon Juice with 1 ounce Simple Syrup in place of Fresh Lemon Sour. Photo of the cocktail leads me to believe they used a single malt scotch. Their comments also said the lemon slightly overwhelmed the scotch, so 2 ounces might be better. Their readers sampled the recipe with Scotch and Bourbon and made the suggestion to cut back on simple syrup if using bourbon.

A really contemporary version to this classic cocktail is on the Art in the Age website. It’s basically a ginger snap flavor variation using a smokier scotch in less proportion. I haven’t sampled it, so I couldn’t comment on the way it tastes. But worth checking out if it appeals to you.

By the way, if you’re interested in how Samuel Clemens began to use the pen name, Mark Twain, you can read one theory which has to do with John Piper’s Saloon on B Street and a pair of whiskeys.

Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon – str8upcocktails @ gmail.com – ©2013 Cheri Loughlin-The Intoxicologist, All Rights Reserved.

Single Malt Scotch Cocktail: Cameron’s Kick

We have quality single malt scotch for your enjoyment.

Single Malt Scotch 042In the world of single malt scotches, you’re more likely to see an old fashioned glass with glistening scotch resting neatly or nestled snuggly within a few chilly rocks than served in a chilled martini glass cocktail style. But in the world of mixed drinks, scotch cocktails are seeing an increase in popularity. There are diehard scotch enthusiasts who believe the spirit shouldn’t be tainted with more than a bit or air, water or possibly a cube of ice. But adventurous consumers demand more. They’ve tasted and sampled the scotch. Now they want to explore and experiment with scotch cocktails.

Cameron’s Kick Scotch Cocktail

Like so many classic cocktails, Cameron’s Kick can be found with numerous recipe variations. I prefer this particular recipe with a Speyside single malt scotch for deeper, richer flavor. The one I used means “Valley of the Deer” in case you’re curious. I also cut the Orgeat syrup to 1/2 ounce for a little less sweet. Orange bitters are a nice addition. Garnish is not called for in the original recipe, but I think this scotch cocktail lends itself rather nicely to a thin orange peel twisted over the top to glean the essential oils and then discarded.

Cameron’s KickCameron's Kick Scotch Cocktail 020

1-1/2 ounce Scotch

1-1/2 ounce Irish Whiskey

3/4 ounce Fresh Lemon Juice

3/4 ounce Orgeat (Almond) Syrup

Combine liquids in cocktail shaker with ice. Shake to blend and chill. Strain into chilled martini glass.

Wine Chateau carries a large selection of quality Scotch for your enjoyment including Single Malt Scotch. The scotch meaning “Valley of the Deer” that I used is in there too! Psst…It’s in a green bottle.

The Cocktail Data Base lists the Cameron’s Kick Cocktail with 1 ounce Scotch, 1/2 ounce Irish Whiskey, 3/4 ounce Lemon Juice and 2 dashes Orange Bitters. There’s no almond syrup, so this recipe might come across a wee bit pungent.

Many other writers, such as Jake Lahne of Smile Politely, use the recipe of 1 ounce each Scotch and Irish Whiskey and 1/2 ounce each Lemon Juice and Orgeat Syrup. Like others, Jake calls for blended scotch rather than single malt scotch. Single malt verses blended is all a matter of preference. Bill’s comment over at Cocktails at the Cove regarding the way the lemon juice disguises the taste of the scotch and whiskey is the reason I prefer a heartier single malt scotch for this particular drink.

It’s a Scotch cocktail after all. I want to taste the scotch!

Post sponsored by Wine Chateau. All commentary and opinions are my own.

Cheri Loughlin Beverage Consultant & Photography Services

Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon – str8upcocktails @ gmail.com – ©2013 Cheri Loughlin-The Intoxicologist, All Rights Reserved.

Auchentoshan Classic Scotch Cocktail

The premier destination to buy fine wine on the Internet.

Auchentoshan Single Malt Scotch Whisky Classic 002 photo copyright Cheri Loughlin

Many believe using a single malt Scotch in a mixed drink is a crime. Using a single malt can add a rich, through-the-line taste and aroma that can’t be beat. The following recipe shows just how great using a single malt can be. Plus, it’s the perfect way to introduce Scotch to the less initiated. – media materials

David Clelland, International Whisky Specialist, introduces Auchentoshan Classic in the video below. He also demonstrates the Glasgow Kiss.

Glasgow Kiss – created by Fat Radish Restaurant, NYC

1-1/2 ounce Auchentoshan ClassicAuchentoshan Single Malt Scotch Whisky Classic 013 photo copyright Cheri Loughlin

1/2 Fresh Pear

1 teaspoon Pear Jam

5 Cardamom Pods

1/2 ounce Orange Curacao

1/2 ounce Lime Juice

1/2 ounce Simple Syrup

Triple Pear Fan Garnish

Muddle cardamom pods and fresh pear in bottom of cocktail shaker. Add remaining liquid ingredients with ice. Shake to blend. Double strain into an old fashioned glass over crushed ice. Garnish with triple fan garnish.

Wine Chateau carries many of the Auchentoshan expressions including the Auchentoshan Classic. Their site includes basic tasting notes, like the ones below provided by the brand, and lengthy technical notes concerning the process and the distillery.

Auchentoshan Single Malt Scotch Whisky Classic 008 photo copyright Cheri Loughlin

Triple distilled and matured solely in American bourbon casks. The result: a Lowland Single Malt Whisky with the sweet aromas of vanilla and coconut; along with the signature smooth, delicate, Auchentoshan taste. – media materials

Offical Auchentoshan Brand Tasting Notes

Color: Pale Gold

Aroma: Rich vanilla and coconut, hint of green apple and a tang of citrus zest

Taste: Sweet vanilla cream, fresh green apple skin and a little mint

Finish: Fresh, floral zestiness

80 Proof / 40% alcohol – $35 to $45 price range depending upon where you buy

Post sponsored by Wine Chateau. – Tasting notes and recipe courtesy representatives of Campari America and Auchentoshan. Auchentoshan on Facebook

Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon – str8upcocktails @ gmail.com – ©2013 Cheri Loughlin-The Intoxicologist, All Rights Reserved.